FAQs

Oral and Dental Health Services FAQs

 

To complement our general and cosmetic dental services, we have prepared a list of FAQs concerning dental health, services offered, and office information:

 

What is a comprehensive dental/oral examination?

 

I have heard about the new All-on-Four Procedure, but can I really afford it?

 
What is difference between preventive dentistry, restorative dentistry, and cosmetic dentistry?

 

Can I prevent gum disease and tooth decay?


What if I have gum disease?


Is fluoride still important for dental health?


My teeth are sensitive, what can I do?


When should I start getting concerned about my child’s teeth?


I’m extremely nervous about major dental procedures, is there anything that can help my nerves?


What are your hours of operation, office location, and contact information?


What payment options do you offer?

 

What is a comprehensive dental/oral examination?

 

A comprehensive dental/oral examination dental exam begins with a hygienist asking you about your medical history, which can include:

 

  • Current medical conditions and all medications/supplements
  • Past medical conditions, surgeries and hospitalizations
  • Experience with anesthesia
  • Allergies
  • Alcohol use and smoking
  • Family medical history

 

A physical examination of your mouth, teeth and gums will follow. This will include the hygienist checking all surfaces of your teeth, including quality of any existing dental work; take x-rays of your teeth; check gums, circumference of teeth, and strength of bone structure supporting the teeth: All of these determine whether there is periodontal disease and/or loss of bone; with these results, the dentist and hygienist can then determine the best course of treatment, if needed.

The hygienist will clean your teeth by removing plaque, calculus and staining from the surfaces of the teeth, even below the gum line, polish your teeth with a smoothing compound, and finish the cleaning with a final, fluoride rinse.

Finally, the dentist will discuss with you any problems or concerns he or she may have regarding your overall oral health and the best treatment plan for you. A referral to a specialist may also be given, if needed.

You should schedule another oral exam and cleaning to occur in six months, or sooner if at risk or under treatment for periodontal disease.

What is difference between preventive dentistry, restorative dentistry, and cosmetic dentistry?

 
Preventive dentistry consists of the regular dental routines everyone should practice to maintain oral health, which includes: Daily brushing, flossing, healthy diet, and seeing your dentist at least twice a year. These simple steps prevent tooth decay, gum disease, and a host of diseases from developing; they also keep your mouth, teeth, and gums healthy, and smile beautiful!

Restorative dentistry repairs or replaces injured, diseased, or abnormal teeth, restoring them to normal function and appearance. Common restorative procedures are crowns, fillings, bridges, dentures and implants. In the most severe cases, restorative dentistry provides full mouth reconstruction, treating and restoring most or all of a patient’s teeth. Thanks to advances in restorative dentistry, today’s procedures are more comfortable and affordable than ever. Take a look at our All-on-Four implant procedure located on our patient services page for one of the most exciting—and affordable—restorative procedures! Another branch of dentistry, cosmetic, follows closely in the vein of restorative.

Cosmetic dentistry is similar to restorative in that some of the restorative treatments produce cosmetic results, and vice versa; consequently, many treatments can be considered either restorative or cosmetic. While restorative procedures are necessary, cosmetic procedures are elective, concentrating on enhancing the appearance of your teeth and smile. Cosmetic procedures include teeth whitening, bonding, veneers, tooth-colored fillings, and others. Major advancements in cosmetic dentistry have made today’s dental treatments more durable and better looking than before, ensuring that you can have a long-lasting and natural-looking beautiful smile.

 

I have heard about the new All-on-Four Procedure, but can I really afford it?

 

You have probably seen all of the advertisements regarding the new all-on-four procedure, our clinic is more focused on providing the service than marketing the procedure so you will find that we are typically thousands cheaper than other clinics who spend a lot of money on marketing.
 

Can I prevent gum disease and tooth decay?

 

To prevent gum disease and tooth decay, you should visit your dentist regularly and practice good oral hygiene at home by:

 

  • Brushing at least twice daily with a soft-bristle toothbrush and an ADA-accepted fluoride toothpaste. Replace brush every two to three months.
  • Flossing daily. Use an 18-inch strand of floss. Ease the floss between teeth; then, lift it up and down several times while curving around the tooth at the gum line. Don’t forget to floss behind your last tooth.
  • Scheduling regular dental appointment at Newell and Flinn, where our hygienist and dentists will administer a comprehensive examination, clean your teeth, and check your teeth, gums, mouth, and throat.

 

What if I have gum disease?

 

Don’t panic! Gum disease has several stages, of which the first is gingivitis. In this stage, gums become red, swollen, and prone to bleeding. At this point, the bone structure is unaffected. However, gum disease can lead to bone loss and the loosening or even loss of teeth, so it is vitally important to follow a treatment plan as put forth by your hygienist and dentist; to not do so could lead to more invasive treatments.

 

Is fluoride still important for dental health?

 

In the past, most people got fluoride by drinking regular tap water; lack of fluoride was not as much of an issue back then. However, with the advent of purified and filtered water—and many opting to drink other liquids in place of water—lack of fluoride has caused a decline in overall oral health, especially in the United States. With these developments, the core truth of fluoride still rings true: Fluoride helps reverse and prevent tooth decay. It strengthens the tooth by replenishing lost minerals on the surface, protecting it against future tooth decay, and it inhibits the growth of bacteria in the mouth, which keeps enamel-destroying sugars from metabolizing in the mouth. Brushing your teeth and rinsing your mouth daily with toothpastes and rinses that contain fluoride will ensure you keep your teeth and mouth healthy!

My teeth are sensitive, what can I do?

 

Sensitive teeth can be caused by many factors. Dentin (the porous part of the tooth) is the region that registers pain, and can do so if your teeth are fractured or chipped, injured due to grinding or clenching, or if your gums have receded, due to disease or harsh brushing.

However, pain from sensitivity can come and go; if you experience constant or severe pain, you may have a more serious problem, which your dentist can diagnose.

Other things you can do to help your sensitive teeth:

  • Brush with a soft-bristle toothbrush to prevent gum irritation
  • Brush with a toothpaste that anesthetizes the dentin (will help with sensitivity to hot and cold foods and beverages)
  • Rinse with a fluoride solution rinse

 

When should I start getting concerned about my child’s teeth?

 

Oral care should start soon after your child is born. Clean your baby’s gums using gauze or a clean, damp cloth. As soon teeth appear, brush with a soft, wet toothbrush and a pea-sized amount of fluoride toothpaste geared specifically for babies and children.

Never let your baby or young child sleep or nap with a milk or juice bottle; always fill with water. This will keep milk sugars from causing tooth decay during your child’s sleep.

Take your child to the dentist for their first dental visit at 6 to 12 months after birth. The doctor may recommend fluoride treatments and/or dental sealants to strengthen your child’s tooth enamel; this will help strengthen the tooth as your child learns the good habits of oral hygiene.

 

I’m extremely uneasy about major dental procedures, is there anything that can help my nerves?

 

Sedation (sleep) dentistry is available for those who fear dental work and involves the use of sedative drugs to avoid the anxiety and discomfort associated with dental visits/procedures. If you have avoided getting dental care because of anxiety or fear, contact us to find out if sedation dentistry is for you.

 

What are your hours of operation, office location, and contact information?

 

Monday – Friday: 8 a.m. – 5 p.m.

4550 Post Oak Place Dr. Ste. 345
Houston, TX 77027


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713-622-4485
info@newfinn.com

We also offer special appointment times outside of regular business hours. To schedule an appointment that fits into your schedule, call us today!

 

What payment options do you offer?

 

We offer a host of payment options to suit all our patients’ needs, including an in-house payment and major procedure financing plans. In addition, we accept most major medical and supplemental insurance policies. And, of course, we accept all major credit cards.

Please contact us if you have any other questions about our payment options.